Ligar Bay – Ship Number 488

Why a post on the Ligar Bay?

Well it’s simple, Bruce Partington has kindly sent me some photos of her build, so I thought I would share some of them.

The Ligar Bay was ship number 488. Her keel was laid on 20.12.63, she was launched on 7.8.64 and sailed 10.10.64.

Bruce doesn’t remember any particular stories from the shipwrights’ point of view, she was just one of the ships which was built at the yaird without any particular incidents which stand out for him. However, there’s always the possibility that another reader remembers something that happened with her.

She was named after a bay in New Zealand, and below you can see Arjan Veen’s photograph of the bay – he has some other excellent photos of his trip to New Zealand, well worth a look.

Ligar Bay, one of the excellent photographs by Arjan Veen to be found at http://www.panaramio.com

The Ligar Bay was a twin screw diesel electric bulk cement carrier built for the Tarakohe Shipping Company Ltd of New Zealand. Her engines were twin single Armature motors, supplied by English Electric. Similar to, but smaller than the John Wilson, No. 478 built in 1961, she was ordered to dimensions of length 210, beam 38 and draft 16 to achieve a speed of 11 knots in service. During trials she achieved 12.636 so kept up Robb yard’s reputation of always exceeding the specs!

However, she was not apparently quite so useful at sea as might have been hoped and you can read the account by Tony Skilton her second engineer on the Leith Built Ships website which highlights this!

Any other memories of her build or her service you would like to share are very welcome!

Copyright: Ruth Patterson 2011

Photos copyright: Bruce Partington 2011

References:

http://leithbuiltships.blogspot.com/2010/09/ligar-bay.html

http://www.panoramio.com/user/3341487/tags/Abel%20Tasman%20Memorial

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About Ruth Macadam

Great Granddaughter of Henry Robb. School teacher.
This entry was posted in British Shipbuilding, Henry Robb, Leith Shipbuilding, New Zealand, Robb's Ships, Scottish Shipbuilding, Shipbuilding and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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